Ravings From The Bog


Hidden Belfast – Clarendon Dock No. 1

Clarendon Dock is now the name for the collection of recently built, up-market and trendy office buildings situated around the original Clarendon Dry Dock or Clarendon No. 1, as it is known. Built between 1790 and 1800, it was joined by No. 2 in 1826. No. 1 remains the largest dry dock in existence in Ireland today. Between the dry docks, in what was the original pump house I believe, is the office of the now defunct Laganside Corporation, which was responsible for the “reclaiming” of  this area in the 1970s and 1980s. The recent dissolution of the Laganside Corporation might explain why this tourist attraction has rubbish and litter lying in the dry docks, which is a shame as there is a walkway open to the public with some large art pieces along with other industrial exhibits right beside the docks.  

Other than my employer, Tesco, renting office space here during its acquisition of Stewarts Supermarkets/Crazy Prices in 1997, I have two tenuous connections to this area. The Rotterdam Bar, now sadly standing on it’s own (for how much longer?) was the scene of a particularly enjoyable night out for me some time in the early 80s, and much further back, I can vaguely remember my father taking me and my brother to board a US destroyer which visited Belfast on a PR mission in 1967. It was docked just fifty yards or so from the dry docks.

Walking around this area, you get a real feel for the gritty industrial side of old Belfast. Having been closed off to the public in recent years, for obvious reasons, this new open access is yet another “peace dividend”. 

Become a “local tourist” – you’ll enjoy taking time out to rediscover our city.

Advertisements

3 Comments so far
Leave a comment

[…] signage starts again once inside Clarendon Dock and leads one through the development and back to the Lagan . The area is mostly given over to […]

Pingback by The Sad State of North Belfast’s Riverside… « Slugger O'Toole

[…] signage starts again once inside Clarendon Dock and leads one through the development and back to the Lagan. The area is mostly given over to […]

Pingback by The Sad State of North Belfast’s Riverside… | Gerry Lynch's Thoughts...

Thanks for this little bit of hidden Belfast history – I’ve just blogged on Slugger O’Toole about the patchy and occasionally very ugly surroundings of the fine cluster of buldings around the Harbour Commissioners and Clarendon Dock – http://sluggerotoole.com/2013/02/21/the-sad-state-of-north-belfasts-riverside/

Comment by Gerry Lynch




Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s



%d bloggers like this: